A Broadside: No. 7 Second Year

019.pdf

Title

A Broadside: No. 7 Second Year

Subject

Ireland
Irish Literary Revival
The Gaelic Revival
Dun Emer Press
Cuala Press
A Broadside

Description

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY E. C. YEATS AT THE CUALA PRESS, CHURCHTOWN, DUNDRUM, COUNTY DUBLIN. SUBSCRIPTION TWELVE SHILLINGS A YEAR POST FREE.
300 copies only.
The woodcut on page [3] has caption: "The Harlequinade". Signed by Jack B. Yeats.

Creator

E. C. Yeats
Jack B. Yeats

Publisher

Cuala Press

Date

December, 1909

Text

THE CHERRY TREE CAROL
Now Joseph was an old man,
An old man was he,
When he wedded Mary,
In the land of Galilee.

O then bespoke Mary,
With words both meek and kind,
'Pluck me some cherries, Joseph,
They run so in my mind.

O eat your cherries, Mary,
O eat your cherries now;
O eat your cherries, Mary,
They grow upon the bough.

'He neither shall be born,
In housen nor in hall,
Nor in the place of Paradise,
But in an ox's stall.

As Joseph and Mary walk thro'
A garden green,
Where cherries and berries,
Were as thick as might be seen.

Then bowed down the highest tree,
Unto God's mother's hand,
O then, she cried, 'See, Joseph,
I have cherries at my command.'

As joseph was a walking,
He heard an angel sing,
'This night shall be the birth-time
Of christ our Heavenly King.'

'He neither shall be clothed
In purple nor in pall,
But all in fair linen,
That usen babies all.

He neither shall be rocked,
In silver nor in gold,
But in a wooden manger
That rested on the mould.'

As Joseph was a walking,
Then did an angel sing:
And Mary's child at midnight,
Was born to be our King.

Then be ye glad, good people,
This night of all the year,
And light ye up your candles,
For his star it shineth clear.

THE COLLIER
You may know a jolly collier as he walks on the street,
His clothing is so handsome, and so neat are his feet;
With teeth as white as ivory, and his eyes as black as soles,
You may know a jolly collier wherever he goes.

You may know a jolly collier, he's a swaggering young blade,
When he goes a-courting of his buxom fair maid;
With his lips he so flatters her, and he spends his money free,
You may know a jolly collier wheresoever that he be.

You may know a jolly collier as he sails the salt sea;
As he ploughs the wide ocean he sets his sails three,
The foresail for to lift her, and the mainsail to drive,
And the little pretty crojick for to make her steer wild.

I'll build my jolly collier a castle on a hill,
Where neither Duke nor Squire can work me any ill;
For the Queen can but enjoy the King, and I can do the same,
And I am but a sheep-girl, and who can me blame?

Original Format

Broadside

Citation

E. C. Yeats and Jack B. Yeats, “A Broadside: No. 7 Second Year,” Linda Lear Center Digital Collections and Exhibitions, accessed December 11, 2018, http://lc-digital.conncoll.edu/items/show/1365.