A Broadside: No. 3 Third Year

Title

A Broadside: No. 3 Third Year

Subject

Ireland
Dun Emer Press
Cuala Press
A Broadside
The Gaelic Revival
Irish Literary Revival

Description

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY E. C. YEATS AT THE CUALA PRESS, CHURCHTOWN, DUNDRUM, COUNTY DUBLIN. SUBSCRIPTION TWELVE SHILLINGS A YEAR POST FREE.
300 copies only.
The woodcut on page [3] has caption: "THE INFORMER". Signed by Jack B. Yeats.

Creator

E. C. Yeats
Jack B. Yeats

Publisher

Cuala Press

Date

August, 1910

Text

DONNELLY AND COOPER
Come all ye true-bred Irishmen, wherever you may be,
Likewise pay attention, and listen unto me;
It is a true story, as ever you did hear,
Of Donnelly and Cooper that fought upon Kildare.

'Twas on the third of June, my boys, the challenge was sent o'er
From Britannia to old Grania, to raise her son once more,
To renew their satisfation and credit to recall,
They are in deep distraction since Donnelly conquer'd Hall.

Old Grania read the challenge and recieved it with a smile,
'You had better hasten unto Kildare, my well-beloved child,
It's there you'll reign victorious, as you've often done before,
And your deeds will shine victorious, as they've often done before.'

The challenge was accepted, these heroes did prepare
To meet brave Captain Kelly on the Curragh of Kildare,
the Englishmen bet ten to one that day against poor Dan,
Such odds as this could ne'er dismay the blood of an Irishman.

When these two champios stripp'd, into the ring they went,
For they were fully determined each other's blood to spill.
From six to nine they parried the time, till Donnelly knock'd him down,
Well done, my child, sweet Grania smiled, that is £ 10,000.

The second round that Cooper fought, he knocked down Donnelly,
And Dan also, being of true fame, he rose most furiously;
Right active then was Cooper, he knocked Donnelly down again,
The Englishman they gave three cheers, crying, the battle is all in vain.

Long life to brave Miss Kelly, she is recorded on the plain,
She boldly stepped into the ring, saying, 'my boy, what do you mean?'
Crying, 'Dan, my boy, what do you mean?' 'my Irish son', said she,
'My whole estate this day I've bet, on you, brave Donnelly.'

Then Donnelly rose up again, and met him with great might,
For to stagnate those nobles all, continued the fight,
Cooper stood in his own defence, exertion proved so frail,
He soon received a temple blow, which hurled him o'er the rail.

Ye sons of proud Britannia, your boasting now recall,
Since Cooper now by Donnelly has met his sad downfall;
For out of 11 rounds, he got nine knock downs, besides he broke his jaw-bone,
Shake hands, says he, brave Donnelly, the fight is quite your own.

Original Format

Broadside

Files

027.pdf

Citation

E. C. Yeats and Jack B. Yeats, “A Broadside: No. 3 Third Year,” Linda Lear Center Digital Collections and Exhibitions, accessed July 21, 2024, https://lc-digital.conncoll.edu/items/show/1373.