A Broadside: No. 6. Seventh and Last Year of the Set

Title

A Broadside: No. 6. Seventh and Last Year of the Set

Subject

Ireland
Cuala Press
A Broadside
The Gaelic Revival
Irish Literary Revival

Description

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY E. C. YEATS AT THE CUALA PRESS, CHURCHTOWN, DUNDRUM, COUNTY DUBLIN. SUBSCRIPTION TWELVE SHILLINGS A YEAR POST FREE.
300 copies only.
The woodcut on page [3] has caption: "THE CANVAS MAN". Signed by Jack B. Yeats.

Creator

E. C. Yeats
Jack B. Yeats
G. N. Reddin

Publisher

Cuala Press

Date

November, 1914

Text

THE OLD GREY MARE
At break of day, I chanced to stray
All by the Seine's fair side,
When to ease my heart young Bonaparte
Came forward for to ride.
On a field of green, with gallant mien
He formed his men in square
And down the line, with looks divine
He rode his Old Grey Mare.

'My sporting boys that's tall and straight
Take counsel and be wise,
Attention pay to what I say,
My lecture don't despise:
Let patience guide yous everywhere,
And from traitors now beware,
For there's none but him that's sound within
Can ride my Old Grey Mare.'

Bonaparte on her did start
He rode too fast, Is Truagh!
She lost a show at Moscow Fair
And got lamed at Waterloo.
But wait till she comes back again
Where she'll have farrier's care,
And the very next date she'll win the plate
My sporting Old Grey Mare.

THE NOBLE THREE
(To the air of 'The Black hores')
One time when walking down a lane
As night was drawing nigh,
I met a colleen with three flowers
And she more young than I.
'Saint Patrick bless you, dear,' said I
'If you'll be quick and tell
The place where you did find those flowers
I seem to know so well.'

She took one flower and kissed it thrice
And softly said to me:
'This flower I found in Thomas Street,
In Dublin Fair,' said she;
'It's name is Robert Emmett
The youngest flower of all.
But I'll keep it fresh beside my breast
If all th world should fall.'

She took and kissed the next flower twice
And softly said to me,
'This flower I culled in Antrim's fields
Outside Belfast' said she;
'The name I call it is Wolfe Tone,
The bravest flower of all.
But I'll keep it fresh beside my breast
If all the world should fall.'

She took and kissed the next flower once
And softly said to me,
'This flower comes from the Wicklow hills,
Its name is Dwyer,' said she.
'But Emmett, Dwyer and Tone I'll keep
For I do love them all.
And I'll keep them fresh beside my breast
If all the world should fall.'
G. N. Reddin.

Original Format

Broadside

Files

079.pdf

Citation

E. C. Yeats, Jack B. Yeats, and G. N. Reddin, “A Broadside: No. 6. Seventh and Last Year of the Set,” Linda Lear Center Digital Collections and Exhibitions, accessed August 11, 2022, https://lc-digital.conncoll.edu/items/show/1424.